www.olqmhereford.org.uk

Our Lady Queen of Martyrs

Roman Catholic Church Hereford

 

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HOLY THURSDAY –  18th April.

 (No morning mass.)

 7.00pm  Mass of the Lords supper.

Followed by watching at the altar of repose till 10.00pm.

(Compline/Night Prayer 9.45pm.)

 

GOOD FRIDAY – 19th April.

10.30am Ecumenical Walk of Witness – Hereford Town Ctr.

12.00noon Stations of the Cross.

  3.00pm Good Friday Service.  

 

HOLY SATURDAY – 20TH April.

(No morning mass.)

9.30am – 10.30am. Confessions.

11.00am & 11.15am Polish Language – Blessing of Bread service.

8.00pm Easter Vigil Mass

 

EASTER SUNDAY – 21st April.

 9.30am Mass

 11.30am Mass

4.00pm Polish Language Mass.

6.30pm Mass.

 

 





















SUNDAY MASSES  - 9.30AM/11.30AM/6.30PM.



DEANERY PILGRIMAGE INFO


PILGRIMAGE TO ROME INFO



1st HOLY COMMUNION COURSE TIMETABLE.


 

CONFIRMATION PREPARATION COURSE 
TIMETABLE.




EASTER SUNDAY. 

- 21st APRIL 2018.










  




















































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































In this, the second-to-the-last week of the Church year, Jesus has finally made it to Jerusalem. Near to His passion and death, He gives us a teaching of hope—telling us how it will be when He returns again in glory. Today’s Gospel is taken from the end of a long discourse in which He describes tribulations the likes of which haven’t been seen “since the beginning of God’s creation” He describes what amounts to a dissolution of God’s creation, a “devolution” of the world to its original state of formlessness and void. First, human community—nations and kingdoms—will break down. Then the earth will stop yielding food and begin to shake apart (13:8). Next, the family will be torn apart from within and the last faithful individuals will be persecuted (13:9–13). Finally, the Temple will be desecrated, the earth emptied of God’s presence (13:14). In today’s reading, God is described putting out the lights that He established in the sky in the very beginning—the sun, the moon and the stars. Into this “uncreated” darkness, the Son of Man, in whom all things were made, will come. Jesus has already told us that the Son of Man must be humiliated and killed. Here He describes His ultimate victory, using royal-divine images drawn from the Old Testament—clouds, glory, and angels. He shows Himself to be the fulfillment of all God’s promises to save “the elect,” the faithful remnant IN today’s First Reading tells us, this salvation will include the bodily resurrection of those who sleep in the dust. We are to watch for this day, when His enemies are finally made His footstool, as today’s Epistle envisions. We can wait in confidence knowing, as we pray in today’s Psalm, that we will one day delight at His right hand forever.